SUMMARY ß Pattern in the Material Folk Culture of the Eastern United States Publications of the American Folklore Society

SUMMARY ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ✓ Henry Glassie

Pattern in the Material Folk Culture of the Eastern United States Publications of the American Folklore SocietyAy to merely popular by examining its form construction and useThe book represents the first attempt to compare different kinds of material folk culture including architecture tools and cookery to detect common patterns and in doing so challenges conventional views of both folk culture and American culture. Henry Glassie is one of my favorite scholars and has been ever since I first read this book almost 40 years ago This is one of his first books and while it isn't and doesn't claim to be the Last Word on the subject it has been one of the most influential books in regional history and material culture studies As usual with Glassie it's also remarkably readable while being also scholarly I've often recommended it to students and others and continue to do so; I've also re read it several times and always find something thought provoking

Henry Glassie ✓ 0 SUMMARY

Amination of material folk culture in the United States He isolates American material culture that segment of our culture that embodies the people's plans methods and reasons for producing things that can be seen and touched and discusses methods for determining whether an object is truly folk as opposed s. I stop and revisit this classic first met in undergrad days every so often Am happy to report that it's still a must read 40 years after its original publication

CHARACTERS Pattern in the Material Folk Culture of the Eastern United States Publications of the American Folklore Society

SUMMARY ß Pattern in the Material Folk Culture of the Eastern United States Publications of the American Folklore Society ã What is folk culture What distinguishes true folk creations from the cultural hybrids of commerce and popular innovation To clarify this What is folk culture What distinguishes true folk creations from the cultural hybrids of commerce and popular innovation To clarify this muddled situation and to provide clear standards and visual examples for the study and appreciation of a broad range of objects Henry Glassie has written this detailed ex. In 1968 Henry Glassie’s Pattern in the Material Culture of the Eastern United States began a scholarly discussion about how folk cultural information might be drawn from material culture particularly toward defining cultural regions in the Eastern United States Glassie argued that it was not enough for folklorists and other academics to study ordinary objects in order to define them and their history and distribution but that objects ought to be studied in order to answer deeper social uestions such as “what an object’s role in the culture of the producer and the user is and what mental intricacies surround support and are reflected in its existence” 16 The folk life material culture patterns he seeks to find and contend for are primarily concerned with geographic or spatial regions in the United States of America as opposed to popular or academic culture that is concerned with temporal periods 33 Using a variety of material culture objects ranging from architecture to food ways Glassie categorizes three distinct regions in the Eastern United States the Mid Atlantic the South and the North According to Glassie these three major folk cultural divisions became particularly distinct roughly between 1750 1850 when the regions’ varied agricultural systems were steered by different values such as the “predominance of popular culture over folk culture in the North the selective conservatism of the Mid Atlantic region and the persistence of traditional patterns in the South” 188 Although these generalizations are all too broad and conclusive sounding they do offer a framework of understanding that can be built upon Glassie acknowledges this actually His section on “Nonregional Patterns” begins to tease out some of the shortcomings of thinking only regionally and illustrates how some material culture such as log cabin uilts and snake fences do not fit neatly into a particular region but transcend all of them He also speaks of the vast differences between the subregions of the South the Lowland vs Upland but seems less concerned with subregions in the Mid Atlantic and North But overall his fieldwork sketches and thorough diverse examples of regional patterns are impressively constructed and do move toward his reasonable call to action for material cultural studies of the Eastern United States