SUMMARY Threads of Life A History of the World Through the Eye of a Needle 100

SUMMARY Threads of Life A History of the World Through the Eye of a Needle

SUMMARY Threads of Life A History of the World Through the Eye of a Needle 100 ì A globe spanning history of sewing embroidery and the people who have used a needle and thread to make their voices heard  In 1970s Argentina mothers marched in headscarves embroidered with the names of their “disappeared” childX Tapestry World War I soldiers coping with PTSD and the maps sewn by schoolgirls in the New World to the AIDS uilt Hmong story clothes and pink pussyhats women and men have used the language of sewing to make their voices heard even in the most desperate of circumstances  Threads of Life is a chronicle of identity protest memory power and politics told through the stories of needlework Clare Hun. From BBC radio 4 Book of the weekTextile artist and curator Clare Hunter travels through the centuries and across continents uncovering the lives of women and men who have used sewing and embroidery to tell their stories sometimes in the most unlikely and hardest of circumstancesFrom the political storytelling of the Bayeux tapestry's anonymous embroiderers to the POWs who memorialized their lives in the harshest of conditions during WWII to the marches celebrating one hundred year's of women's suffrage in 2018 this is a treasure trove of book Clare Hunters reveals how sewing and embroidery are as much about identity politics and memory as they are about craft and art Threads of Life is also peppered throughout with moments from Clare's own life as a textile artist for instance her first adventures with needle and thread or the discovery of a beautifully worked patchwork uilt in an aunt's attic decades later Listeners will delight in this celebration of sewing as an intimate and powerful medium for telling storiesRead by Siobhan RedmondAbridged by Julian WilkinsonProduced by Elizabeth Allardhttpswwwbbccoukprogrammesm000

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Ter master of the craft threads her own narrative as she takes us over centuries and across continents from medieval France to contemporary Mexico and the United States and from a POW camp in Singapore to a family attic in Scotland to celebrate the age old universal and underexplored beauty and power of sewing Threads of Life is an evocative and moving book about the need we have to tell our story. I was about to give 4 stars to this book because it doesn't include pictures of the mentioned pieces but this wouldn't give justice to the very well written research of Clare Hunter The history of textiles and embroidery is full of tears sadness and poverty and many of the stories brought tears to my eyes This book is a tribute to the brave women who expressed their feelings fought for a better world and made a living out of sewing I feel very proud that my family is full of such women and I am very grateful that they passed the knowledge to me and now I am able to stitch my own embroideries for future generationsIf you are about to start reading this book be prepared to search for the images of the embroideries on the Internet This isn't necessarily bad because through your research you will discover websites with plenty of information on textiles' history and important events that you may have never heard about in the past

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Threads of Life A History of the World Through the Eye of a NeedleA globe spanning history of sewing embroidery and the people who have used a needle and thread to make their voices heard  In 1970s Argentina mothers marched in headscarves embroidered with the names of their “disappeared” children In Tudor England when Mary ueen of Scots was under house arrest her needlework carried her messages to the outside world From the political propaganda of the Bayeu. I am admittedly the perfect reader for this book embroiderer history nerd I found it so utterly readable and fascinating—packed with many things I didn’t know and only a few things that were familiar to me From time to time I found myself wishing for photos of the pieces the author mentioned but then I came to my senses embroidery is hard to photograph well Even leaving aside all of the pieces mentioned here that have been lost to the ravages of time or political upheaval No image can capture the tactile joy the texture of thread worked by hand the tiniest details the thrill of taking in something that feels larger than life This book made me want to hold all of these fabrics and textiles and artworks in my hands—which speaks highly of Hunter’s writing and her obvious love of her subject matter That was another thing I enjoyed the author’s own involvement in needlework and craftivism which was woven pun throughout the book memoir style I like that Hunter uietly places herself among the stories she tells sharing glimpses into her own explorations and activism in needle and threadI could easily have read at least another hundred pages of this Give me all your stories about stitching