READ º Fewer Better Things

READ & DOWNLOAD Ê PLANTHIREINBATH.CO.UK Ù Glenn Adamson

Fewer Better ThingsTo groups he often asks an audience member what he or she knows about the chair the person is sitting in Few people know much than whether it's made of wood plastic or metal If we know little about how things are made it's hard to remain connected to the world around us Fewer Better Things explores the history of craft in its many forms explaining how raw materials tools design and techniue come together t. The myth of the dumb objectYou cannot go visit someone through our screens Individuals are reduced to a screen scroll of texts We have tactile contact with the screen and make it our master If an event is not digitally captured to the cloud then it did not happen The only permanent anchor in our lives will be the cloud The problem is that as we come to depend on these mysterious machines and we are less and less aware of our physical environment On a famous mountain trail in my city I came within a foot's length of a woman who was walking down the trail as I was going up She exclaimed I did not see you Her gaze was fixed on her screen She had no eyes for the physical world much less the spiritual nor for the humans she was with and among She was entirely operating in a virtual reality Notice that I did not say livingHer reality is made in and through a screen She was caught off guard by my presence because she was ignoring the physical world We aren't even aware of how unaware we are states Adamson I have come toe to toe with such unawareness and come away as a woman present yet unseen

READ Fewer, Better Things

READ º Fewer, Better Things Õ Curator and scholar Glenn Adamson opens Fewer Better Things by contrasting his beloved childhood teddy bear to the smartphones and digital tablets children have today He laments that many children and adults are losing touch with the material objects that have nurtured human development for thousands of years The objects arO produce beauty and utility in handmade or manufactured items Whether describing the implements used in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony the use of woodworking tools or the use of new fabrication technologies Adamson writes expertly and lovingly about the aesthetics of objects and the care and attention that goes into producing them Reading this wise and elegant book is a truly transformative experienc. The title is misleading and the content is somewhat academic and dry boring

Glenn Adamson Ù 1 READ

Curator and scholar Glenn Adamson opens Fewer Better Things by contrasting his beloved childhood teddy bear to the smartphones and digital tablets children have today He laments that many children and adults are losing touch with the material objects that have nurtured human development for thousands of years The objects are still here but we seem to care less and know less about them In his presentations. I don’t know that I agree with other reviewers when they come to the conclusion that this book’s title is misleading Not with an overline that reads “The Hidden Wisdom of Objects” nor with a perfectly adeuate description of the book’s contents available right inside the cover You know what you’re in for various informed musings on how objects come to be from someone who used to be director of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York among other thingsCome on people Were you expecting the ubiuitous Marie Kondō – againWith Fewer Better Things Glenn Adamson takes you on a grand tour of people’s rapport to material realities but he also takes care not to wear you out By the time you’re done with this essay you’ll have thought about all kinds of materials long established traditions in craft versus current industrial techniues the place of objects in your life the implications of an ever growing digitalization of resources the roles and strategies of museums and much The chapters are short but elouent and each one either brings new water to the mill or shifts your perspective by a few degrees I believe Adamson trusts you to independently reflect further on each concept he introduces and I love that his approach is not moralistic The broad culture displayed from one chapter to the next makes this a rich and interesting read; I found the author’s use of real life situations and third party expertise judicious through and throughAll of this book’s efforts have to do with putting humans back into the heart of well things The end result is a generalist view presented smartly in an amiable tone Very glad I picked this up