SUMMARY Ú A Morbid Taste for Bones

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SUMMARY Ú A Morbid Taste for Bones ↠ Ellis Peters' introduction to the murderous medieval world of Brother CadfaelA Morbid Taste for BonesIn the remote Welsh mountain village of Gwytherin lies the grave of Saint Winifred Now in 1137 the ambitious head of Shrewsbury Abbey has decided to acuire the sacred remains for his Benedictine order Native WOving the grave has been shot dead with a mysterious arrow and some say Winifred herself held the bow Brother Cadfael knows a carnal hand did the killing But he doesn't know that his plan to unearth a murderer may dig up a case of love and justicewhere the wages of sin may be scandal or Cadfael's own rui. This book is actually uite good I must admit though I had a hard time getting through it In fact I pretty much had to sit myself down and force myself to read through to the end I’ve decided that has much to do with me than the book itself conseuently my high rating The truth is I just don’t like mysteries and now I know that even by setting the mystery in a fascinating time period this doesn’t change When I was younger I used to read every Agatha Christi ‘Poirot’ story I could get my hands on and I think I burned myself out Most of the time I just don’t care about ‘whodunit’ This leaves the magnetism of the detective to carry the story which recently just hasn’t been enoughFor people who love mysteries though I think you will love this Peters writes very well She uses dialogue to bring her characters to life and it’s great I was surprised at how funny this book was Cadfael is simply a GREAT character Peters also captures the 1100s with insightful details into monasterial life I think so many authors forget how powerful and important the church truly was during this time This same attention to detail was used on the inner workings of a medieval Welsh village too So many books just make out the villagers out to be ignorant clods but Ellis is much generous than that giving everybody a rounded feel Everybody has a different agenda and a different motive and Cadfael is able to work this out uite clearly and succinctlyMaybe someday I will be in the mood to read another Cadfael book but I think I’m going to skip historical mysteries for a while I do believe this is the crème de la crème of historical mysteries though

Ellis Peters Å 1 SUMMARY

Ellis Peters' introduction to the murderous medieval world of Brother CadfaelA Morbid Taste for BonesIn the remote Welsh mountain village of Gwytherin lies the grave of Saint Winifred Now in 1137 the ambitious head of Shrewsbury Abbey has decided to acuire the sacred remains for his Benedictine order Nat. Great historical mystery series Since this info was hard for me to find below is a list of the Cadfael novels in order of publicationA Morbid Taste for BonesOne Corpse Too ManyMonk's HoodSt Peter's FairThe Leper of St GilesThe Virgin in the IceThe Sanctuary SparrowThe Devil's NoviceDead Man's RansomThe Pilgrim of HateAn Excellent MysteryThe Raven in the ForegateThe Rose RentThe Hermit of Eyton ForestThe Confession of Brother HaluinThe Heretic's ApprenticeA Rare BenedectineThe Potter's FieldThe Summer of the DanesThe Holy ThiefBrother Cadfael's Penance

READ Æ PLANTHIREINBATH.CO.UK Å Ellis Peters

A Morbid Taste for BonesIve Welshman Brother Cadfael is sent on the expedition to translate and finds the rustic villagers of Gwytherin passionately divided by the Benedictine's offer for the saint's relics Canny wise and all too wordly he isn't surprised when this taste for bones leads to bloody murderThe leading opponent to m. Affectionate SarcasmThis first Cadfael story is about clerical arrogance deceit vanity pettiness ambition vengefulness and ultimately homicide in a 12th century monastic community It also touches on idolatry and superstition in medieval Britain And it makes several clever swipes at clerical celibacy and misogyny miracles religious piety and the efficacy of prayer Yet for all that it cannot be judged anti religious It is clearly a work in which there is an underlying appreciation for the ideals of medieval Catholic cultureEdith Pargeter’s skill in carrying off such apparently contradictory intentions is probably what makes her Cadfael series so popular What she endorses about Christianity is unstated but understood It is the character of Cadfael himself who after a rather full life of adventure sexual as well as geographical finds monastic life and its routines to be just what he needs It is through his eyes that all the deficiencies of the Church are observed and recorded And yet he implicitly assures the reader that it remains a worthwhile institutionThere is than a touch of Pre Raphaelite sentimentality in Pargeter’s prose captured rather well I think in the cover of my edition Nevertheless it is impossible for me at my stage in life to disagree with Cadfael’s express motivation for adopting the lowly status of monk “When you have done everything else perfecting a conventual herb garden is a fine and satisfying thing to do” I understand entirelyPostscript I suspect that Pargeter’s St Winifred is based on the legend of the 12th century St Frideswide patron saint of Oxford The famous Pre Raphaelite stained glass artist Edward Burne Jones created a large window in Oxford’s Christ Church Cathedral in 1858 depicting scenes from her life The last of these has various of her devotees surrounding her deathbed see below In the background Burne Jones has placed a modern porcelain flush toilet Pargeter emulates just this sort of tongue in cheek humour in her story