Read Hidden Cities: The Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American Civilization 107


characters Hidden Cities: The Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American Civilization

Read Hidden Cities: The Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American Civilization 107 è Few realize that some of the oldest largest and most complex structures of ancient archaeology were built of earth clay and stone right here in America in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys From 6000 years ago until uite S and historians Roger Kennedy presents a fascinating picture of these American antiuities as well as their reception among leading citizens of the young United States On missions of exploration politics and even piracy men such as George Rogers Clark George Washington Albert Gallatin and Thomas Jefferson freuently chanced upon the architecture of the past As Kennedyshows us the magnificence of the mound building cultures through the sometimes prejudiced eyes of the Founding generation he reveals not only the astounding history of our continent but also the reasons why we have refused to credit Native American predecessors with the greatnes. A fascinating book in spite of being tedious going at times Few people are even conscious of the great dying that occurred in North America in the years following the arrival of the first Europeans; I was only vaguely I had heard of the mounds but wrongly assumed them to be merely relatively small scale burial sepulchers I had no idea of the enormous scale size and scope of ancient American construction It boggles the mind It's a shame so many sites were bulldozed to make room for the encroachment of highways suburbia Walmart etc

Hidden Cities The Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American CivilizationS and historians Roger Kennedy presents a fascinating picture of these American antiuities as well as their reception among leading citizens of the young United States On missions of exploration politics and even piracy men such as George Rogers Clark George Washington Albert Gallatin and Thomas Jefferson freuently chanced upon the architecture of the past As Kennedyshows us the magnificence of the mound building cultures through the sometimes prejudiced eyes of the Founding generation he reveals not only the astounding history of our continent but also the reasons why we have refused to credit Native American predecessors with the greatnes. A fascinating book in spite of being tedious going at times Few people are even conscious of the great dying that occurred in North America in the years following the arrival of the first Europeans; I was only vaguely I had heard of the mounds but wrongly assumed them to be merely relatively small scale burial sepulchers I had no idea of the enormous scale size and scope of ancient American construction It boggles the mind It's a shame so many sites were bulldozed to make room for the encroachment of highways suburbia Walmart etc

Summary ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ✓ Roger G. Kennedy

Hidden Cities: The Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American Civilization · He Druids of Salisbury Plain they patterned extraordinarily precise geometry according to the rising and setting of the moon Like the ancient Egyptians they organized millions of hours of human labor to construct pyramids platforms and plazas In Hidden Cities Roger G Kennedy sets out on a bold uest of recovery a recovery of the rich heritage of the North American peoples and a reimagination of the true relations of their modern day successors and neighbors From the Spanish and French explorers to the present very few Euro Americans have paid attention to the evidence and meaning of this heritage Building on recent work of many archaeologist. I thought it was a good idea to follow up on my reading of the Gears’ Ancient America novel People of the Owl by digging into a non fiction book my father in law recently rescued from Savers or someplace Hidden Cities the Discovery and Loss of Ancient North American Civilization by Roger G Kennedy The insides of the book were anticipated by the cover – a color painting hypothesizing the great expanse of Illinois’ Cahokia Mounds complex as it might have looked in its heyday eight or nine hundred years ago Actually Kennedy’s emphasis centers on the ancient mound building cultures archaeologists call the Adena and Hopewell of the Ohio River ValleyThe first thing I learned was the great extent of urban and sacred architecture constructed by Native Americans in the middle of the continent starting around 3000 BC and continuing up till the time of European contact Thousands of sites were encountered by early white explorers from DeSoto to Daniel Boone But of course only a fraction of those still exist today Kennedy describes what happened along the way and discourses on the meaning of it alluite the scholarly historian Roger Kennedy was the director of the National Park Service and former director of the American History Museum at the Smithsonian Institution I had previously read his interesting insights into American character in “Burr Hamilton and Jefferson” His historical angle in this work delves into the reactions of notable Americans to the ancient architecture of the Native American No less a personage than George Washington took an early interest in the archaeological sites It is well known that Thomas Jefferson had a keen fascination likewise But Kennedy brings forth in his pages many other lesser known people who mapped studied and affected the fates of the cultural artifacts – people such as Albert Gallatin George Rogers Clark Henry Brackenridge and Thomas Worthington Through the pages we meet colorful characters such as James Wilkinson who “betrayed Washington spied for Spain betrayed Aaron Burr and survived a trial for treason” but whose archaeological reports earned him membership in the American Philosophical Society Kennedy also brings to life a little known time when the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers were rough frontiers bordering on foreign lands and populated by disenchanted expatriates spies adventurers profiteers and river pirates Some of this only marginally informs about the native cultures and the Indian mounds but these same personages were the first and sometimes only ones to describe some of the ancient earthworks that were soon to be plowed under or excavated for backfillSo it’s a predictably sad story It starts out that way of course as we contemplate the Great Dying the continent wide plagues that killed the greater part of the native population leaving only the architecture behind By the time the history is brought up to date and we realize to what extent even those monuments have been obliterated the sense of loss is very depressingI think it takes a strong interest in the subject matter to get through this book Kennedy is not an easy read His prose can be almost impenetrable at times and even the structure of the book is somewhat erratic Chapter by chapter and by section it’s chronological but the reader can easily be lost within chapters as the author jumps around across time and geography I was almost tempted to skip on to the end when the final chapters became muddled with Kennedy’s personal speculations on the mathematical and geometrical significance of the mounds On the other hand for those looking for a challenging book on the subject this one is packed with detail that will sent them off to further research of their own I know I’ve added uite a few archaeological sites to my own “to visit” list Summary ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ✓ Roger G. Kennedy

Roger G. Kennedy ✓ 7 Read

Roger G. Kennedy ✓ 7 Read Few realize that some of the oldest largest and most complex structures of ancient archaeology were built of earth clay and stone right here in America in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys From 6000 years ago until uite recently North America was home to some of the most highly advanced and well organized civilizations in the world complete with cities roads and commerce From the lost city of Balbantsha near New Orleans to the Great Hopewell Road a causeway for religious pilgrims along the Ohio River in the thirteenth century these cultures built hundreds of thousands of structures of which a small but tantalizing portion still remain Like t. At times it seems that my adult reading now only follows in the footsteps of my childhood bookishness I remember a picture book of world civilisations that included drawings of monumental earthworks from pre Columbian north America What I knew about pre Columbian north America could have been written on the back of the proverbial postcard so the promise on the back cover about discovering cultures euivalent to those of Mexico or ancient Egypt in their ability to build great monuments was enough for me to buy the book when I discovered it in the second hand department of what was the old Dillons bookshop on the corner of Gower Street while I was trying with some success to avoid gainful employment by studying at the University of LondonThe Aztecs and the Incas are relatively well known yet the idea of urban societies or even of dense urban settlement in ancient north America is unfamiliar For many of us well fed on a childhood diet of westerns as well as cowboy and Indian dramas the image of the Plains Indians has shaped our imagination This book offers up something stranger and compelling the evidence of densely populated settled societies in early north America and the story of their later discovery and the varied attempts at understanding those remains from the 18th century down to the beginning of the 20th centuryThe book begins with a description of the mysterious collapse of the complex societies mostly found in the Ohio valley and ends with the uestion of why mounds huge massive man made mounds were constructed in the first place but between those chapters we spend time with Albert Gallatin George Washington Thomas Jefferson those in his employ and the Mormons There is a whole spectrum of explanations and uses made of the remnants of those cultures from a religious history to repeated patterns of land use good settlement sites and land suitable for agriculture being fairly constant to astonishment at the scale of some of the remainsRace based theories and the needs of the expanding colonial society also feed into the mix so the reader not only discovers something of the prehistory of North America but also something of the United States' intellectual and cultural history The book becomes then a double journey to the present that shows the reader the biases and beliefs of succeeding generations as well as something of the repeated shock of the discoveries Well worth reading