Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer Read ¸ 108

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Ving into uestions of censorship and propaganda while sourcing a title from North Korea; or simply getting hold of The Corsair the first atari novel to be translated into English Morgan illuminates with wit warmth and insight how stories are written the world over and how place geographical historical virtual shapes the books we read and write. I'm not sure who the audience for this book is but probably not readers like me who like reading memoirs about books It is of a PhD thesis on the world of reading and seems to largely exclude her personal experience with particular books There is a nice list of books she has read from around the world at the end but it isn't even annotated Just a list of titles and authors

Read & download Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer

Reading the World Confessions of a Literary ExplorerA beguiling exploration of the joys of reading across boundaries inspired by the author's year long journey through a book from every countryFollowing an impulse to read internationally journalist Ann Morgan undertook first to define the world and then to find a story from each of 196 nations Tireless in her uest and assisted by generous far f. I was really disappointed with this book as I thought it was going to be about the books the author read during her year of reading the world To me the most interesting bit of the whole book was the bibliography at the back Instead of being about the books she read it was about such things as what makes a nation; how she came to choose the countries she included in her list of one hundred and ninety six books; the invidious influence of British Imperialism and American domination and how difficult it is for authors to have their work published in some countriesIf I'd wanted to read about geography history of the world or censorship I would have been reading books about those subjects Instead I wanted to read about the author's experience of reading books outside her comfort zone I really didn't want to know about her agonising over which countries to include and why she included them and how much other people she came across influenced her choice of books Overall apart from feeling totally mislead by the blurb I found this book pretty indigestible and it read as though the author didn't want to waste any of her research It seemed to me as though she just threw it all at the page and left the reader to pick out the bits they wantedSo if you want to read a potted history of books and publishing across the world then read this book but if you want to know about the books she read you'll need to read them yourself which is where the bibliography comes in handy If you want to read a book about the contents of books then this isn't for you

Ann Morgan Æ 8 Read

Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer Read ¸ 108 ✓ A beguiling exploration of the joys of reading across boundaries inspired by the author's year long journey through a book from every countryFollowing an impulse to read internationally journalist Ann Morgan undertook first to define the world and tLung strangers Morgan discovered not only a treasury of world literature but also the keys to unlock it Whether considering the difficulties faced by writers in developing nations movingly illustrated by Burundian Marie Thérese Toyi's Weep Not Refugee; tracing the use of local myths in the fantastically successful Samoan YA series Telesa; del. 25 Morgan a freelance writer and book blogger devoted 2012 to reading one book from each country of the world If you’ve come to this expecting a thorough rundown of those nearly 200 books – how she chose them what they’re about and what she thought – you will be disappointed Many blog to book adaptations repeat content from blog entries or streamline the year’s activities into an accelerated narrative Morgan does neither; not a single paragraph from her blog made it into the book This is not then just another bibliomemoir A better balance could have been struck between recycled blog content and academic musings on postcolonial literature and censorship An interest in the politics of literature in translation would be a boon to anyone attempting thisSee my full review at Shiny New BooksBibliomemoirs I’d recommend as an alternative if that’s your thing How to Be a Heroine by Samantha Ellis My Life in Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead